air-conditioner-leaking

Why Is My Air Conditioner Leaking Water?

You’ve reached the hottest days of summer, and your home AC unit is cranking. But when you go outside, you notice a cause for alarm. Water is pooling around your AC unit.

Is that normal, you think? My air conditioning shouldn’t be leaking water, right?

The truth is: An HVAC leak is a common issue. In fact, according to Popular Mechanics, about 90 percent of HVAC service calls are due to leaks. Fortunately, the majority of leaks can be remedied quickly and at a low cost.

But it’s important that the problem is fixed as soon as you notice it. Leaking water can seep into your home AC unit, causing extensive damage that may require the unit to be replaced. In other words, if you notice a leak, call an HVAC company.

What’s Creating the Water in My AC Unit?

Residential air conditioners all feature the same components. Outside, you have a condenser unit, which looks like a large boxed-in fan. Inside, there’s another unit that contains evaporator coils.

Refrigerant flows through the coil, and when warm air passes over these chilled coils, the air temperature drops significantly. This ultimately is the air that flows through your ductwork and cools your home.

But the evaporator coils also accumulates condensation, just like a glass of ice water on a hot day. It’s completely natural for the coils to “sweat,” and there’s a system in place to ensure this condensation drains from the system.

From the coils, the condensation drops into an overflow pan, and then flows into a condensate drain line. This either connects into your plumbing or drains out of the house. Some homes also require a pump to send water away from the system.

Most commonly, the cause of the leak has to do with this condensation not properly draining, or too much of it being produced.

Common Causes of Leaking AC Units

 

  1.   A Cracked or Clogged Drain Pan

Over time, your AC’s drain pan can become damaged.  For example, if your AC is reaching its limit of its service life, the drain pan may have become corroded and rusted through. As such, water drains freely through the pan, and begins to pool underneath. Replacing the drain pan can remedy the issue.

Additionally, algae, dust, and debris can also collect in the pan, effectively clogging the drain hole. In this case, cleaning the pan may resolve the issue.

  1.   A Damaged or Clogged Condensate Line

If the pan is clear, the condensate line itself may be clogged. Typically, condensate lines are built with PVC pipe, and when clogged, they can back up water. Water begins to collect within the pipe and drain pan, and ultimately the system can properly drain. Flushing the condensate pipe can resolve the clog. Additionally, a cracked pipe can also leak water, which may be the source of the issue.

  1.   A Faulty Condensate Drain Pump

Finally, if your home uses a drain pump, there’s a chance that it’s not working properly. This ultimately backs up the entire condensate draining system. In this case, the pump would need to be replaced.

  1.   A Dirty AC Filter

Dirty AC filters can cause a range of issues. That’s why it’s important to schedule yearly and seasonal maintenance for your home AC. Why does a dirty filter cause leaks? A dirty filter can freeze up the evaporator coils. When the coils thaw, they produce too much water for the drain pan to handle.

  1.   Low Refrigerant

An AC without enough refrigerant can cause a number of issues. Most noticeably, the system won’t cool as effectively. But like the dirty filter, the low refrigerant can also cause the coils to freeze, which will overflow the pan after it thaws.

  1.   Low Outside Temperatures

Late in the summer, and in early fall, temperatures tend to fluctuate more dramatically. Running your AC in cool weather –  low 60s and cooler – the coil block can freeze. Again, after it thaws, your drain may overflow.

Solving a Home AC Leak

As you can see, the cause of your leaking air conditioning might not be as serious as you think. Replacing a drain pan, line or pump, or the AC’s air filter doesn’t require a significant investment, and it can ensure your AC keeps running in tip-top shape.

The key though is catching these issues early. During cooling season, regularly inspect your home’s AC unit. A small amount of water is normal, but if you notice a lot of water pooling up underneath, you might have a problem. In this case, it’s best to call an HVAC company to have a look.

 

 

pest-hvac-comfort-pro

3 Ways to Make Sure Pests Don’t Enter Through Your HVAC

Pests enter your home through numerous pathways. Some are obvious like leaky windows or doors. Yet, one that’s often overlooked is your home’s HVAC system. Gaps and holes in your HVAC system offer convenient access for pests like stink bugs, silverfish, and rodents. But what can you do to ensure your HVAC is protected?

Fortunately, pest-proofing your HVAC system doesn’t require costly investments. A few minor maintenance tasks, regular inspections, cleaning and occasional pest prevention will help you avoid a full-blown infestation.

HVAC Pests: Why Prevention Is Best

From foul odors to costly damage, rodents, insects, and small animals can do a lot of damage to your home in a small amount of time. By taking regular abatement measures, you can prevent damage from occurring. What types of problems do they cause? Here are a few of the most common:

  • Home and equipment damage: Pests can cause significant damage to your home. Termites, for example, can destroy wood structures, leading to thousands of dollars in repairs. When it comes to your HVAC, damage occurs in a few ways. For one, pests love to move into your outdoor air conditioning unit. An A/C infestation can cause performance issues and even failure. Inside, pests can damage or eat through ductwork and seals.
  • Air quality issues: An infestation can affect your health by diminishing interior air quality. Odors, pesticides, allergens and pest debris can all infect your home’s air quality.

HVAC Pest Prevention Measures

A few specific pest abatement measures can help protect your HVAC system long-term. In particular, keep a close eye on areas where pests can enter your HVAC system: Exterior vents and flues, outside equipment, and your home’s ductwork. Steps you can take to protect them include:

  1.     Seal Ducts, Vents and Flues

Exterior vents like an attic vent, soffit or dryer vent all pose potential pathways for pests. Similarly, you want to ensure that the ductwork is properly sealed. Not only will this help prevent pests infestations, it can also help you save on heating and cooling. Small gaps and cracks within the ductwork can turn into pest highways, which is particularly problematic because odors, debris and allergens carried by the pests into the ductwork will be distributed around the home.

  1.     Regular Duct Cleaning, HVAC Maintenance

Even with the best seals, pests will find ways to enter the home. One strategy to prevent larger issues is proper duct cleaning. By cleaning your ducts, you’ll remove any debris and allergens that have collected, and the HVAC cleaning professional can help you identify potential problem areas. Also, pay particular interest to the dryer vent. Dryer vent inspection or cleaning should be conducted several times per year to prevent lint build-up, which can attract rodents and insects.

Another strategy: HVAC maintenance. A seasonal tune-up for your A/C or heating equipment will ensure that pests like stink bugs haven’t infested the equipment. Bi-yearly cleanings, inspections and maintenance checks are recommended.

  1.     Clear Outdoor Units

Your air conditioning unit is exposed to the elements, and without proper protection, it can become a magnet for pests. One strategy: Ensure that the unit has been properly mounted on a raised slab and that grass and weeds are regularly cut back away from the unit.

Alternatively, you can set traps for pests local to your region. For example, in some areas, stink bugs can infest HVAC units. Setting stink bug traps around your HVAC unit can help to solve the problem. Additionally, setting stink bug traps near vents will help to limit the pest’s ability to enter the home.

 

An HVAC system that’s not properly maintained can attract problem pests. Prevent damage to your home and health by ensuring your system is properly protected. Regular duct cleaning and maintenance help to clear issues and identify problem areas. Contact us for more information today.

 

Efficient HVAC Multifamily Home

Choosing An Efficient HVAC System for a Multifamily Home

Developers of multifamily housing have numerous initial decisions to make at the start of a project. Yet, the type of HVAC system that will be used in the property is a decision that has long-term implications. This article will outline efficient HVAC systems for a multifamily home.

Ultimately, the decision comes down to a number of factors, from installation and long-term maintenance costs, aesthetics and energy efficiency, as well as the size of the property. Low-rise buildings, for example, tend to have different needs compared to mid-rise or high-rise developments.

Beyond this, multifamily developments also have unique HVAC requirements, compared to single-family homes. Multifamily HVAC units must deliver:

  • Peak load flexibility: It’s difficult to estimate the peak energy demand of a multi-family property. Therefore, the system must be optimized to handle a variety of peak loads.
  • Individual comfort controls: Occupants must have in-unit controls, which can be delivered in a number of ways.
  • Ease of maintenance: HVAC units may be contained in-unit or as part of a centralized system. Either way, the system should be designed to be easily maintained.

Ultimately, the question remains: Which systems are the most energy efficient?

Centralized vs. Decentralized HVAC Units

HVAC units for multifamily buildings fall into two categories: Centralized and decentralized systems. Centralized HVAC systems are similar to a home’s heating and cooling systems. Heat and/or AC are feed from a central location – typically a mechanical room in the basement or in a penthouse of the building. Centralized systems do have a higher cost, and therefore, they’re more common in mid-rise and high-rise properties with many units.

Decentralized units, on the other hand, are compartmentalized. Each unit is treated as its own building, and separate heating and cooling systems are delivered to the individual units. These units are typically considered “self-contained.” Baseboard heat is another type of decentralized system.

Energy Efficiency of Centralized and Decentralized Systems

In general, centralized systems outperform decentralized HVAC systems in terms of energy efficiency. Yet, the higher installation costs may make these systems cost prohibitive. Common types of centralized HVAC systems include:

  • Hot Water Baseboard: These systems deliver hot water from a central location to individual units. Essentially, the hot water flows through the radiator, as the radiator sucks in cooler air and heats it. This type of system is economical to install and is fairly efficient.
  • Two-Pipe Systems: This system includes a central water boiler, as well as a central cooling plant, which is typically on the roof. These systems have two pipes – one for delivering hot or cold water – and one for returning. Therefore, heat and A/C cannot be delivered at the same time. Efficiency is boosted with these systems.
  • Four-Pipe Systems: Four-pipe systems utilize similar equipment to the two-pipe system, but since there are four pipes, heating and cooling can be provided at the same time. Therefore, Apartment A can choose heat, while Apartment B can choose to cool. These systems are expensive to install, but are well-known for their efficiency.
  • Geothermal Systems: One of the most efficient types of HVAC systems, geothermal utilize a water loop buried within the earth to heat or cool the water. This water can then be delivered to individual units with a two- or four-pipe system.

Comparatively, decentralized systems are, on average, more cost-effective to install, but most do not deliver maximum efficiency.

  • Electric Baseboard Heat: Baseboard heat is one of the most economical options to install. But these systems are inefficient and carry high operating costs, and they’re only capable of providing heat.
  • Wall Unit Air Conditioner: Like baseboard heaters, wall units are cost-effective to install, but they are inefficient. Additionally, these systems typically only provide cooling.
  • Packaged Thermal Air Conditioner: A common heating/cooling option used in hospitality developments, PTAC systems are wall-mounted forced air systems units. Generally, these systems have shorter life cycles, and they aren’t very efficient.
  • Self-Contained Systems: These are forced air systems that deliver heating and cooling an individual unit. Heating and cooling equipment is installed in each individual unit, either in a closet or mounted to an exterior wall. In terms of decentralized HVAC units, the self-contained systems offer the best efficiency.

Additional Tips for Developing Energy Efficient HVAC Systems

Ultimately, your choice of HVAC unit will set the standard for the system’s efficiency, but there additional steps that can be taken as well. For example, properly sealing heating and cooling ductwork can instantly optimize a system. Additionally, improving the insulation of the building envelop can reduce the system’s overall heating or cooling load.

To schedule an appointment or if you have any questions please contact us today!

 

HVAC technician working on an air conditioning unit to provide AC unit maintenance tips.

Air Conditioner Maintenance Tips

As your air conditioner gets up there in life, you should probably start preparing for the inevitable. Home and business owners that get 10-15, or even 20 years or more from their HVAC system should consider themselves extremely lucky, especially when many are only rated or warrantied for 8-12 years. Of course, as Ernest Hemingway said, “you make your own luck” and in the A/C world that comes from regular system maintenance. An air-conditioner is far from a ‘plug and play’ unit that can be turned on in the spring and put away in the fall.

Your best bet to extend the life of you’re A/C is to perform regular maintenance on the unit; these maintenance tips must be followed semi-regularly.

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Geothermal Energy vs. Solar Panels: Which Has Better Value?

“Going Green” is no longer just for progressive thinking homeowners or those looking to live in a commune and proverbially go off the grid. Instead, having energy efficient property is now an integral part of being a responsible homeowner, not only to lower utility bills, but also as a crucial way of limiting a carbon footprint against an increasingly unpredictable environment.

The best way we can lower our impact on the environment (and save some money in the process) is by harnessing the Earth’s resources to heat and cool our homes and businesses. The two main ways to use the Earth’s free energy for your own good are with solar panels and geothermal pumps. Solar panels capture the sun’s rays and convert it into heat and electricity, which is used to heat and cool your home, while geothermal solutions use the constant core temperature of the Earth to warm and cool a property.

Geothermal vs Solar

The big question remains then: which method offers more return on investment between solar panels and underground geothermal pipes? The answer is provided from a combination of your climate, your existing setup, and how much you’re prepared to invest.

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A traditional heat pump next to a house showing comparison to geothermal heat pump.

Geothermal Heat Pumps vs. Traditional Heat Pumps

The main concept of geothermal energy is one that’s relatively easy to grasp. For example, the Earth has a constant core of 50°-60°F at all times no matter the temperatures above ground. It makes sense then that we can harness that energy and use it to heat or cool our homes, but here’s where the process gets a little murky – not so much a matter of why, but how?

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A geothermal heating and air conditioning checkilist showing the benefits of geothermal heating system.

Geothermal Energy Pros and Cons

Instead of using natural gas or oil and as an alternative to incurring high electricity bills, geothermal energy works to draw off the Earth’s constant core temperature to both heat and cool the home. At first glance, incorporating geothermal energy into a house or business would seem like a no-brainer and while there are definite cost and economic savings involved with the process, all that glitters isn’t gold. Here are the definitive geothermal energy pros and cons:

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A melting ice cube on a blue surface representing why air conditioning units freeze.

Why Do Air Conditioners Freeze?

An air conditioner unit has the potential to freeze. It’s a strange sight, especially in the middle of a hot summer day, but that’s when it’s most likely to happen. A frozen air conditioner is a common problem and can sometimes be fixed easily. Other times, however, you’ll need an air conditioner repair technician to take a look at it.

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A man holding HVAC gauges demonstrating how to recharge a home AC unit.

Recharging a Home AC – What You Need to Know

Central air conditioners have one primary job: to keep you comfortable. If your AC doesn’t do this and it is appropriately sized for your home, something is wrong. You have heard the advice to change your filters, keep it cleaned, and to have a smart thermostat, but did you know that air conditioners may also need to recharge? If your system has malfunctioned or has been damaged, your refrigerant may need to be recharged. Here’s what you need to know about recharging a home AC.

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Air Conditioner and Heat Pump Compressor Unit in Backyard that has common problems.

Common AC Problems

Throughout the years, we’ve seen and repaired a lot of AC problems. The more complex the system, the higher the potential for problems. Knowing the symptoms and what the problems are can potentially add a few years to the life of your system as you may be saving other parts in the process. Here is a list of the most common AC problems and their symptoms.

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