Why Does My Heater Come on When-System-Is-Set-to-Cool

Why Does My Heater Come on When System Is Set to Cool?

Noticed a sudden spike in your electricity bill? Or maybe your air conditioning runs for extended periods of time without cooling the house?

If so, you might be experiencing a malfunctioning HVAC system. More specifically, your system’s heater is turning on even though the air conditioner is set to “cool.”

What is causing your heater to activate? Electrical issues within your central AC unit are the most likely causes of your heater turning on when it shouldn’t. Shorted wiring, faulty electronics in your furnace, or an electrical problem with your thermostat, for instance, could all explain the issue.

Bottom line, when you suspect your heater is turning on improperly, contact an HVAC specialist. Working with live wires and electrical components can be very dangerous. But the good news: This issue can typically be reversed with a quick repair.

3 Air Conditioner Issues that Can Cause Your Heater to Turn On

One of the quickest fixes for this problem: Check to see if your thermostat is set to “cool.” It sounds overly simple, but you’d be surprised how easy it is to change settings accidentally.

If your air conditioner is, in fact, set to chill, a range of issues could be triggering the heater to turn on. The most common include:

  1.   A Faulty Thermostat

Most solutions for this problem require the expertise of an HVAC technician. But you can examine your system’s thermostat. If the thermostat has lost power, this could be the source of your problem, for example.

If your thermostat is battery powered, try changing the battery. Also, if you see a blank screen, check to see if a breaker has tripped. Worst case scenario, the thermostat is defective, in which case, you’d need to have the thermostat replaced.

  1. Thermostat Connection Is Faulty

The thermostat’s connection to the furnace and AC unit may become disconnected. Or the wiring from the thermostat to the units could short out.

In other words, your thermostat may be in “cool” mode, but their furnace and AC unit have no way of knowing that. This can trigger the heater to turn on. These shorts can be caused for some reasons. For example, water damage and even rodents can both cause a short. Ultimately, a heating and cooling expert can help you restore the connection.

  1. Electrical Problems at the Furnace

Your AC and heater work in close cooperation together. In fact, even during summer, the blower within your furnace is responsible for circulating cold air throughout the home.

Inside the furnace though, there’s a complex network of wires and circuit boards. Over time, or due to water damage, these boards can malfunction and short out. And that’s a common cause of the heater issue.

In a nutshell, the furnace’s motherboard tells it exactly what to do. When it’s not properly working, the “cooling signals” the furnace receives from the AC unit and thermostat can’t be properly understood – which can trigger the heater on.

Contacting a Heating and Cooling Company to Restore Your AC System

There’s nothing quite as frustrating as a malfunctioning HVAC system. But the good news is that most HVAC problems tend to have relatively quick and low-cost solutions.

In the case of a heater that’s turning on, the simplest fix might be changing batteries in your thermostat or resetting a tripped breaker. Even more complex solutions like a circuit board replacement or wiring restoration can be finished quickly and easily.

Bottom line, if you’re experiencing this problem, contact a heating and cooling specialist. A technician will be able to diagnose the cause quickly, and get your AC system up and running in no time.

 

ac-and-dehumindifier

Why Doesn’t My AC Unit Come with a Dehumidifier?

Your air conditioner is cracking, but the air in your home still feels clammy. This shouldn’t be happening right? Well, this all-too-common problem tends to be the result of high levels of humidity in the air in your home.  

Here’s why this happens: Your AC acts as a natural dehumidifier. During the air cooling process, moisture is collected from the air, condensed on coils, and then drained away.

But in areas with high levels of relative humidity, the air conditioner doesn’t dehumidify the air fast enough, and the result is that wet, cold air. Fortunately, there are a variety of routes homeowners can take to dehumidify interior spaces.

Solutions for Dehumidifying the Home

You can remedy the problem by running your AC for longer periods of time, but this solution is costly. Your home’s heating and cooling costs will quickly increase.

A better option: Standalone dehumidifiers. Independent units are designed to focus only on dehumidification – and they’re much less costly to operate and much more efficient than air conditioners.

In particular, you have two options:

  • Whole-Home Dehumidifiers: Whole home dehumidifiers tie into your existing HVAC system. These units are designed to dehumidify every room in the home. Mostly, they collect air from vents within each room, and this air is sent to the dehumidifier. They’re very versatile, as you can dehumidify the home even if you’re not running the AC. Also, just like AC units, whole house dehumidifiers are available in a wide range of sizes.
  • Portable Dehumidifiers: Portable units, on the other hand, work similar to whole-home dehumidifiers. These are small, single room units that plug into the wall. Unlike whole home dehumidifiers, though, portable units collect the excess moisture in a pan in the bottom of the unit (whereas whole house units tie into drains). There are portable dehumidifiers for large rooms and spaces, as well as small units available for studio apartments and bathrooms.

A Key Benefit of Dehumidifiers. In addition to dehumidification, standalone units also act as air purifiers. As they remove moisture from the air, they filter out allergens, dust, and mites from the air. This is one reason many people install them in addition to a central air unit.

Does Your Home Need a Dehumidifier?

If you’re unsure if your home needs a dehumidifier, it’s best to contact an HVAC specialist. HVAC companies can help you determine the relative humidity of your home, and if it’s in the range of 50-60 percent, a dehumidifier might be necessary.

Plus, HVAC companies can also help you correctly size your AC unit. An oversized AC unit is a No. 1 cause of high humidity in the home. Because the unit is too large, it cools the home too quickly, before the AC can dehumidify the space. If this is the problem, right-sizing your unit might be the best option for your moisture problem.

Ultimately, a dehumidifier can save you from costly damage caused by high levels of humidity in the home. When the home’s relative humidity reaches about 55-60 percent, you might experience issues like:

  • Mold and mildew
  • Conditions for dust mites
  • Allergies, asthma and other respiratory conditions can be exacerbated
  • Ruined furniture
  • Clammy and stuffy indoor air

 

Don’t settle for swamp-like air in the home. Install a whole house dehumidifier and zap the problem. Comfort Pro offers a range of solutions for home dehumidification. Contact us today to learn more about your options.